Monthly Archives: May 2016

Making vulnerable OpenSSL scanning target

OpenSSL vulnerabilities appear regularly. Sometimes it is difficult to find out whether your vulnerability scanner can effectively detect specific vulnerability.

In fact, the only way to find this out is to scan a vulnerable host. Without this knowledge, it is dangerous to start a huge network scanning. You never know, the scanner did not find a vulnerability, because the infrastructure is safe or it wasn’t able to do it.

Let’s make the simplest stand: CentOS host with Apache and a self-signed OpenSSL certificate.

Vulnerable OpenSSL stand

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PHDays VI: The Standoff

A week ago I was at PHDays (Positive Hack Days) 2016 conference. For those who don’t know, there are two main events for security practitioners in Russia: PHDays in May and ZeroNights in November. Day-Night. Like this play on words. =)

phdays_logo

So, it was my 6th PHDays. I visited them all. But on this one for a first time I was as an ordinary visitor and not from organizers side. To be honest, I have never participated in organizing of PHDays, and just seen the final result. So, nothing changed much for me. As usual, organization was at very high level. And it’s not just my opinion, but the opinion of many participants.

Sad things first. And they are likely sad only for me. You know my passion to vulnerability assessment/management systems and scanners. So, despite the fact that Positive Technologies are the organizers of this event and Maxpatrol is still their’s flagman product, it was hard to hear anything related to vulnerability assessment/risk assessment/threat intelligence on PHDays. Isn’t it strange? Could you imagine this at Qualys QSC or Tenable event? Nothing much about critical controls and IT compliance in general.

It’s clear that vulnerability assessment is not already in trends in Russia. All are crazy about SIEM and slightly less about Anti-APT and SCADA security. Sad, but true.

Anyway, I have seen many interesting presentations about honeypots, computer forensics, machine learning and security startups. I also visited a SIEM roundtable with representatives of Positive Technologies, First Russian SIEM (RuSIEM), ArcSight, IBM Qradar, Splunk, and Cisco Systems. More details under the cut.

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SteelCloud ConfigOS

Sometimes LinkiedIn shows me an interesting advertising. For example, today I watched a  recorded demo of SteelCloud ConfigOS. It is a proprietary tool that performs automated DISA STIGs compliance checking for RHEL or Windows  and provides automated remediation.

Well, as it works automatically, it  won’t make custom SELinux configuration for you, for example. In the other hand, this software is for the US military and related organizations, where everything should be highly standardized.

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Tenable Nessus: registration, installation, scanning and reporting

It’s a bit strange that I wrote in this blog about some relatively exotic vulnerability management solutions and not about the one I use every day. It is, of course, Nessus. The legend of vulnerability scanners. It would be fair to say that Nessus has become a synonym for vulnerability scan itself as Xerox for photocopy. First version of Nessus was developed by Renaud Deraison in 1998 as a free and open-source product. In October 2005 the license was changed to proprietary. The last version of GPL source codes became the base for the great open source vulnerability scanner – OpenVAS (btw, see my post “openvas_commander for OpenVAS installation and management”).

Nessus Vulnerability Scan Results

I am glad that Tenable still keeps Nessus mostly in UNIX-way. Nessus is a vulnerability scanner and makes one thing good – finds vulnerabilities on network hosts. If you need dashboards, advanced user management, advanced reporting capabilities, etc. use Tenable Security Center that works above the Tenable separate products: Nessus, Passive Vulnerability Scanner (PVS) and Log Correlation Engine (LCE).

nessus download page

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Vulnerability Management in APAC

Tenable Network Security published Forrester report on Vulnerability Management in APAC (China: 25%, Singapore: 25%, Japan: 25%, ANZ: 25%). Everything is pretty bad. The majority of the respondents scan their systems periodically (annually). Key challenges: the difficulty of remediation and prioritization. It seems that 30% respondents don’t even have automatically updatable Security Content in their VM solution.
Forrester Vulnerability Management in APAC