Monthly Archives: December 2019

CISO Forum 2019: Vulnerability Management, Red Teaming and a career in Information Security abroad

Today, at the very end of 2019, I want to write about the event I attended in April. Sorry for the delay 😅. This doesn’t mean that CISO Forum 2019 was not Interesting or I had nothing to share. Not at all! In fact, it was the most inspiring event of the year, and I wanted to make a truly monumental report about it. And I began to write it, but, as it usually happens, more urgent tasks and topics appeared, so the work eventually stopped until now.

The first discussion was about Offensive Security and Red Teams in particular

At CISO Forum 2019 I participated in two panel discussions. The first one was about Offensive Security and Red Teams in particular.

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Detectify Asset Inventory and Monitoring

Continuing the topic about perimeter services. As I mentioned earlier, I don’t think that the external perimeter services should be considered as a fully functional replacement for custom Vulnerability Management processes. I would rather see their results as an additional feed showing the problems your current VM process has. Recently I tested the Detectify’s Asset Inventory (Monitoring) solution, which provides such feed by automatically detecting the issues with your second, third (and more) leveled domains and related web services.

Detectify Asset Inventory screenshot from the official blog

Let say your organization has several second level web domains, over9000 third (and more) level domains, and you even don’t know for what services they are used. This is a normal situation for a large organization. So, you simply add yourorganization.com to Detectify, activate Asset Monitoring, and Detectify automatically discovers third (and more) level domains and related technologies: web services, CMS, JavaScript frameworks and libraries. “It provides thousands of fingerprints and hundreds of tests for stateless vulnerabilities such as code repository exposure for SVN or Git.” This is called fingerprinting.

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