Monthly Archives: August 2016

Qualys Vulnerability Management GUI and API

It has been a long time since I wrote something about Qualys, but today I will write not just about their free product or service, like SSL Labs, but about the main Cloud Platform.

Qualys VM GUI and API

Qualys pioneered cloud Vulnerability Management. How the cloud VM works? In simple terms, there is a web portal https://qualysguard.qualys.com (or .eu for Europe). You can login there, specify a list of IP addresses you want to check and Qualys server(-s) will scan this hosts and show you a vulnerability report.

Qualys Login

Ok, it’s clear with perimeter, but what if some hosts are only accessible from your internal network? In this case, you need to purchase Qualys network appliance, which will communicate Qualys server (read more at “Using Qualys Virtual Appliance“). You create a scan task on Qualys web portal to scan hosts in your internal network, Qualys server gives an order to appliance to gather information about these hosts and to send it back to the server for analysis. Most of the security analysis is done “in the cloud” by remote Qualys servers. End-user manage VM service either through Qualys  web-portal GUI, or API.

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Export anything to Splunk with HTTP Event Collector

In a previous post I described how to export Nessus scan reports to Splunk server using standard app. Today let’s see how to export any structured data presented in JSON, including of course Nessus scan reports, to Splunk using HTTP Event Collector.

http event collector Splunk

First of all, we should create new HTTP Event Collector

http://your_splunk_host:8000/en-US/manager/launcher/http-eventcollector

And press “New Token” button

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Exporting Nessus scan results to Splunk

In this first post I want to write about Splunk and Nessus integration via official “Splunk Add-on for Tenable”: how to install this application, its pros and cons.

Splunk official addon for Nessus

You can download Splunk application package for Tenable Nessus and SecurityCenter from official website here (free registration is required). All documentation is available here.

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Tenable SecurityCenter and its API

SecurityCenter is an enterprise level vulnerability management product of Tenable Network Security. As the name implies, the it is designed to be the center of Tenable security infrastructure. SecurityCenter takes data from other Tenable products: Passive Vulnerability Scanner (PVS), Log Correlation Engine (LCE), Nessus, and provides a powerful GUI interface for searching and reporting. Sounds familiar? Well, yes, it is something like SIEM, but with a strong emphasis on Vulnerability Management.

Tenable SecurityCenter 5

I’ve took this screenshot from SC5 video presentation in Spanish.

In this post, I certainly will not fully cover SC functionality and all the features of its API. I just would like to pay tribute to a convenient asset mechanism of SecurityCenter and show very basic operation of SecurityCenter API: retrieving the results of the vulnerability scanning (as I did it for Nessus in “Retrieving scan results through Nessus API“).
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Vulnerability Assessment without Vulnerability Scanner

This will be a practical confirmation of my thesis from “Vulnerability scanners: a view from the vendor and end user side“: the scanner for one operating system is easy to make. I also want to demonstrate that data collection and data analysis for Vulnerability Assessment may be successfully performed separately. There is no need to take the data directly from the vulnerable hosts, when it is already stored somewhere else, for example in IT monitoring systems.

Assessment without vulnerability scanner

The opacity of data collection and the need to have a privileged account on the remote host, traditionally causes conflicts between IS and IT departments and complicates implementation of VM process.

So, to detect vulnerabilities on our Linux host we need to know what version of the packages contain vulnerabilities, which versions of packages are installed on our hosts, and learn how to compare versions.

How do I know which versions of packages are vulnerable?

Vulnerable versions of packages are listed in official security bulletins:
RHEL – https://access.redhat.com/errata/RHSA-2016:0304
CentOS – https://lists.centos.org/pipermail/centos-announce/2015-April/021064.html
Debian – http://www.debian.org/security/2015/dsa-3197
Ubuntu – http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/usn-2537-1/

CESA bulletin example

Of course, you will need to parse them first. Or you can just download the same content already parsed and presented in JSON format with Vulners.
download CESA bulletins from Vulners
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