Author Archives: Alexander Leonov

VB-Trend 2018 Splunk Conference

Today I attended VB-Trend 2018 Splunk conference organized by system integrator VolgaBlob.

VB-Trend 2018

Video fragments from the event:

Comparing to “Splunk Discovery Day“, the conference was much smaller (less than 100 people), focused on technical aspects, Information Security and informal communication. And I need to say that there really was a lot of talks with colleagues from different companies, not only about Splunk, but also about Vulnerability Management, Application Security and Container Security.

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Making CVE-1999-0016 (landc) vulnerability detection script for Windows NT

The fair question is why in 2018 someone might want to deal with Windows NT and vulnerabilities in it. Now Windows NT is a great analogue of DVWA (Damn Vulnerable Web Application), but for operating systems. There are a lot of well-described vulnerabilities with ready-made exploits. A great tool for practising.

Making CVE-1999-0016 (landc) vulnerability detection script for Windows NT

Well, despite the fact that this operating system is not supported since 2004, it can be used in some weird legacy systems. 😉

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Adding custom NASL plugins to Tenable Nessus

Making custom NASL scripts (plugins) for Nessus is a pretty complicated process. Basically, NASL (Nessus Attack Scripting Language) is an internal instrument of Tenable and it seem that they are not really interested in sharing it with the community. The only publicly available official documentation, NASL Reference Guide and NASL2 reference manual, was written at least 13 years ago. Certainly many things changed since then in the actual product.

Adding custom NASL plugins to Tenable Nessus

However, it’s still possible to add custom NASL scripts into the plugin set of your Nessus server. Let’s see how to do it. Everything was tested in the latest Nessus 8.

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Splunk Discovery Day Moscow 2018

Today I attended the Splunk Discovery Day 2018 conference. It is something like a local equivalent of the famous Splunk .conf. More than 200 people have registered. The event was held in the luxury Baltschug Kempinski hotel in the very center of Moscow with a beautiful view of the Red Square and St. Basil’s Cathedral.

Recently, I have been working more and more with Splunk: I develop connectors, write searches and dashboards, optimize them. Splunk has become the main data visualization tool for me.

Splunk Discovery Day Moscow 2018

Video from the event (27 minutes). This is NOT a complete recording of speeches, but rather some fragments and slides.

At the same time, I make most of data analysis with my own Python scripts. Currently this approach seems more effective. But as for providing final results in a beautiful way and making various notifications, in this sphere Splunk is really convenient and useful. Of course, I can make own a Web GUI application that will do something similar for my tasks, it doesn’t make sense if there is an Enterprise level tool that is very good for this.

My tasks are not quite typical for Splunk clients from Security Teams who look at it in the context of SIEM and SOC mainly. Asset Inventory is actually similar to Business Intelligence: almost all connectors are non-standard, and there are no strict requirements for real time (we operate with days and months, not seconds). We have same approach: “Bring some data to Splunk and get insights from it.” And in this sense, it is great that this event was NOT for the information security experts mainly.

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Deploying VirtualBox virtual machines with Vagrant

I often use virtual machines for various tasks: from building software packages to testing software products or PoCs for vulnerabilities. Creating a virtual machine in Oracle VirtualBox is a time-consuming and annoying process: set parameters of VM, attach iso, make dozens of clicks in OS installation GUI interface, wait until everything is installed, configure network and install guest additions.

Vagrant and Oracle VirtualBox

Of course you can create an image of the base machine once and clone it each time you need it. But from time to time you will still need to recreate this image, for example for a new Linux release. It would be much easier, if we could get a fresh and clean Virtual Machine that meets our requirements and with minimal effort. And this is what Vagrant by HashiCorp does.

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