Author Archives: Alexander Leonov

About Alexander Leonov

Hi! My name is Alexander and I am an Information Security Automation specialist. You can read more about me here. Currently, the best way to follow me is my Telegram channel @avleonovcom. I update it much more often than this site. If you haven't used Telegram yet, give it a try. It's great. You can also discuss my posts or ask a question at @avleonovchat.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday July 2020: my new open source project Vulristics, DNS SIGRed, RDP Client and SharePoint

I am doing this episode about July vulnerabilities already in August. There are 2 reasons for this. First of all, July Microsoft Patch Tuesday was published in the middle of the month, as late as possible. Secondly, in the second half of July I spent my free time mostly on coding. And I would like to talk more about this.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday July 2020: my new open source project Vulristics, DNS SIGRed, RDP Client and SharePoint

Vulristics

I decided to release my Microsoft Patch Tuesday reporting tool as part of a larger open source project (github). I named it Vulristics (from “Vulnerability” and “Heuristics”). I want this to be an extensible framework for analyzing publicly available information about vulnerabilities.

Let’s say we have a vulnerability ID (CVE ID) and we need to decide whether it is really critical or not. We will probably go to some vulnerability databases (NVD, CVE page on the Microsoft website, Vulners.com, etc.) and somehow analyze the descriptions and parameters. Right? Such analysis can be quite complex and not so obvious. My idea is to formalize it and make it shareable. It may not be the most efficient way to process data, but it should reflect real human experience, the things that real vulnerability analysts do. This is the main goal.

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Barapass, Tsunami scanner, vulnerabilities in Windows DNS Server and SAP products, weird attack on Twitter

This episode is based on posts from my Telegram channel avleonovcom, published in the last 2 weeks. So, if you use Telegram, please subscribe. I update it frequently.

Barapass, Tsunami scanner, vulnerabilities in Windows DNS Server and SAP products, weird attack on Twitter

Barapass update

I recently released an update to my password manager barapass. BTW, it seems to be my only pet project at the MVP stage, which I use every day. 😅

What’s new:

  1. Now I am sure that it works on Windows 10 without WSL. And you can run it beautifully even with the icon. 😊 Read more about installation in Windows in this file.
  2. Not only “copy the next value to the clipboard” (or “revolver mode” ) is now possible in the search results section. You can also get the previous value or copy the same value one again if it was somehow erased in the clipboard. Previously, I had to retype the search request each time to do this, and it was quite annoying. By the way, I unexpectedly discovered that the user input history inside the application magically works in the Windows shell (using up and down arrows) without any additional coding. On Linux it does not.
  3. You can set a startup command, for example, to decrypt the container.
  4. The startup command and quick (favorite) commands are now in settings.json and not hard-coded.
  5. settings.json, container files and decrypted files are now in “files” directory. It became more convenient to update barapass, just change the scripts in the root directory and that’s it. I divided the scripts into several files, now it should be more clear how it works.

So, if you need a minimalistic console password manager in which you can easily use any encryption you like – welcome! You can read more about barapass in my previous post.

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday June 2020: The Bleeding Ghost of SMB

This time, Microsoft addressed 129 vulnerabilities: 11 critical and 118 important. In fact, in the file that I exported from the Microsoft website, I saw 2 more CVEs (CVE-2020-1221, CVE-2020-1328) related to Microsoft Dynamics 365 (on-premises). But there is no information on them on the Microsoft website, in the MITRE CVE database and NVD. Does this mean that these CVE ids were mentioned unintentionally and related to some critical issues? I don’t think so, but this is strange.

This time there were no vulnerabilities with detected exploitation, so let’s start with the group “Exploitation more likely” according to Microsoft.

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How to list, create, update and delete Grafana dashboards via API

I have been a Splunk guy for quite some time, 4 years or so. I have made several blog posts describing how to work with Splunk in automated manner (see in appendix). But after their decision to stop their business in Russia last year, including customer support and selling software and services, it was just a matter of time for me to start working with other dashboarding tools.

How to list, create, update and delete Grafana dashboards via API

For me, Grafana has become such a tool. In this post I want to describe the basic API operations with Grafana dashboards, which are necessary if you need to create and update dozens and hundreds of dashboards. Doing all this in the GUI will be painful. Grafana has a pretty logical and well-documented API. The only tricky moments I had were getting a list of all dashboard and editing an existing dashboard.

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Add new features to Notepad++ using Python scripts: keyboard shortcut to insert current time

I have to say, I spend a lot of time daily in Notepad++ text editor for Windows. I keep my “logbook” there. I record what I am doing now and what needs to be done. This allows me not to keep everything in my head and switch the context more efficiently. I can recommend this to everyone. And it is especially useful to note when you started working on a task and when you finished. This gives an understanding of what actually takes your time. I’m not a fan of very strict and formal techniques such as pomodoro, but using some form of time management is good.

Add new features to Notepad++ using Python scripts: keyboard shortcut to insert current time

Recording timestamps manually is inconvenient. It would be much easier to press a key combination and automatically insert the current timestamp into the document. It turned out that this is possible, and even more – you can get the results of any Python script this way!

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday May 2020: comments from VM vendors, promising stuff for phishing, troubles with SharePoint and lulz with Visual Studio

This will be my third Microsoft Patch Tuesday report in video and audio format. And for the third time in a row, Microsoft has addressed over a hundred vulnerabilities. With my Microsoft Patch Tuesday parser, it was possible to generate a report almost on the same day. But, of course, it takes much more time to describe the vulnerabilities manually.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday May 2020
  • All vulnerabilities: 111
  • Critical: 16
  • Important: 95
  • Moderate: 0
  • Low: 0

Last time I complained that different VM vendors release completely different reports for Microsoft Patch Tuesday. This time I decided that it’s not a bug, but a feature. I upgraded my script to not only show vulnerabilities, but also show how these vulnerabilities were mentioned in the reports of various VM vendors (Tenable, Qualys, Rapid7 and ZDI). In my opinion, it seems pretty useful.

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Anti-Phishing process with advanced phishing attacks simulation

This time I want to write about the service of my friends from Antiphish. They call it “security awareness and employee behaviour management platform”. Simply put, they teach company employees how to detect and avoid phishing attacks.

By the way, they are great guys, made a demo for me, prepared custom templates, like in real PoC for a corporate client. Thanks so much for the excellent work!

The main idea

When you sign in to the Antiphish interface, you see the dashboards with information about the people who studied security courses, were tested during the course and were checked using emulated phishing attacks (some of these attacks are amazing, and I’ll show them at the end). This is the main idea. How can you protect your organization from phishing attacks? Educate people and constantly provoke them. Not just to send an email and see the employees who visited your “malicious” website. No, there should be a process!

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