Tag Archives: NASL

Vulners NASL Plugin Feeds for OpenVAS 9

As I already wrote earlier, you can easily add third party nasl plugins to OpenVAS. So, my friends from Vulners.com realised generation of NASL plugins for OpenVAS using own security content. I’ve tested it for scanning CentOS 7 host. And it works =)

Vulners OpenVAS vulnerabilities

Let’s see the whole process.

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Great OpenVAS news: delay in plugin feed will be dropped, new GVM-Tools for remote management released

Jan Oliver Wagner, CEO of Greenbone and OpenVAS Community leader sent recently several messages to community email list with the great news.

First of all, Greenbone decided to drop two weeks delay in a free plugin feed, that was implemented in June 2017 and made some OpenVAS users pretty nervous.

I wrote about it in “GSM Community Edition and lagging OpenVAS Plugin Feed“. The good thing is that, it has increased interest in NASL scripting among OpenVAS users. I also made some steps in this way in “Adding third party nasl plugins to OpenVAS“. I don’t now why Greenbone finally decided to drop this delay, but I am very glad for this decision. Wise move!

The feed will stay delayed until September 4th, 2017. To demonstrate the current state I used some data from Vulners.com collections. Let’s see the nasl vulnerability detection plugins for CentOS in Nessus and OpenVAS. I know that Windows would be much more clear, but Microsoft released latest MS17-023 bulletin in March, so now there is no much difference there.

CentOS Nessus Openvas 2 week delay

As you can see, no OpenVAS plugins since 2017-08-16, literally two weeks. And I hope this will change very soon.

Don’t forget that NVT will be called now GCF (Greenbone Community Feed) and some advanced enterprise-level checks will be now released only in paid feed.

Another good news is the recent release of open source GVM-Tools for controlling OpenVAS remotelly. It will replace old console client openvas-cli (omp). Let’s try to download and install it on Debian host with installed OpenVAS (see “Installing OpenVAS 9 from the sources“).

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Adding third party nasl plugins to OpenVAS

If you want to develop nasl plugins for OpenVAS, you might be interested how to import them in scanner. So, I was also interested.

First of all, I decided to copy one of existing nasl scripts. I chose script that successfully detected vulnerability on a target host. Thus, in the case of importing error, I would know for sure that it’s not because of syntax errors in script, but, for example, because non-existing plugin signature.

I scanned target CentOS host, chose and copied script file, changed id of the script (oid) and script title, rebuilt database. Then I rescanned target host.

CESA edited

As you can see, new script is also in results. Pretty straightforward.

CESA edited description

Now, let’s review the actual commands.

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GSM Community Edition and lagging OpenVAS Plugin Feed

As I already wrote in “Installing OpenVAS 9 from the sources“, since May 2017 OpenVAS 9 is available in a form of free virtual appliance. It is called GSM Community Edition (GCE) and is based on Greenbone commercial product GSM ONE.

What’s the difference between GSM ONE and free GCE? GSM Community Edition uses different Community Feed of NASL plugins, it can’t be updated automatically and does not have some management features. The most important, in my opinion, is that it does not support OpenVAS Management Protocol (OMP), API for managing scanners. Only HTTPS for WebGUI and SSH are available.

GSM start screen

Talking about different NASL plugin feeds, I need to mention recent message by Jan-Oliver Wagner in Openvas-announce list.

That seems like Greenbone is rather tired of developing OpenVAS by themselves and watching how other companies use theirs engine and feeds, positioning themselves as an “alternative to Greenbone’s product at a better price”. So, they decided:

  1. “OpenVAS NVT Feed” will be renamed to “Greenbone Community Feed”
  2. Public access to the “openvas-nvts” SVN repository will be forbidden, but the license of nasl plugins won’t be changed.
  3. Now Community Feed lags 14 days from commercial feed, but Greenbone would like to make an actual feed, but without some features for enterprise customers.

I really care about Greenbone and they, of course, do as they think is better for the company and OpenVAS community, but at the same time it reminds me situation with Tenable and Nessus. Maybe not so radical. But definitely in the same direction.

Feed delayed for 2 week can’t be used effectively for obvious reasons. If you see exploitation of critical vulnerability like WannaCry in the wild and will need to wait 2 weeks to check your infrastructure, it’s a nonsense! 🙂 That’s mean that you just can’t rely on OpenVAS anymore. And if you use it, you should think about migration on commercial solution, for example on Greenbone’s GSM, or think about getting actual plugin feed somewhere else.

The good thing, it might show customers once again that knowledge base of Vulnerability Management solution is important and stimulate other security content developers to make own nasl scripts and feeds.

But let’s go back to GSM Community Edition. Detailed description of installation process you can find on official site. I will just describe my own experience.

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What’s actually new in Tenable.io VM application

My last post was about the structure of a new Tenable.io cloud platform. Now, let’s see what is actually new in Tenable.io Vulnerability Management application.

Tenable.io VM is obviously based on Nessus Cloud, which in its turn had features similar to Nessus Manager briefly reviewed earlier. So, today I want to concentrate only on new features.

Tenable.io VM

According to the public interface screenshots and Tenable.io datasheets, it will have some new dashboards and reports, free integration with PVS and Nessus deployed on-premise, and something very new in asset management.

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