Tag Archives: Nessus

Scaner-VS: Vulnerability Management solution for Russian Military

Scaner-VS is a Vulnerability Assessment system developed by Moscow-based NPO Echelon. It’s pretty popular in Russian government organizations, especially in Russian Army, because it comply all government requirements, has all necessary certificates and is relatively cheap.

Scaner-VS webgui

As for requirements and certificates, NPO Echelon itself is an important certification authority, so they know how to do the things right. It’s not a secret product or something. You can request trial version freely at http://scaner-vs.ru/version-for-testing/. But note, that it is only available in Russian. I am also sorry, but screenshots in this post will be also in Russian. I will try to do my best to describe them properly.

When you fill the form on Echelon website, you will soon get a link to 3.3 gb .iso file by email. Run it in VirtualBox virtual machine (choose Debian 64 or Debian 32).

Here is a boot menu. Choose first default option.

Scaner-VS boot

Some seconds later you will see Linux desktop environment with Scaner-VS web-GUI opened in Firefox.

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Problems of Vulnerability Prioritization and Detection

It’s the third part of our talk with Daniil Svetlov at his radio show “Safe Environment” recorded 29.03.2017. In this part we talk about Vulnerability Prioritization and Detection:

  • Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS)
  • Environmental factor
  • Manual and  automated vulnerability detection
  • Unauthenticated and authenticated  scanning
  • Why vulnerability scanners are so expensive and why the can’t detect everything

Scanner does not detect all vulnerabilities

Video with manually transcribed Russian/English subtitles:

Prioritization

– Here also the question how to prioritize vulnerabilities properly. Because if you have, as you said, two Linux servers and 20 workstations running Windows, then in principle, you may not need to do prioritization. But if you have fifteen hundred servers: some of them are on perimeter, some are in your DMZ, some are in the internal network. It is still necessary, probably, to understand correctly which vulnerabilities and where should be patched in in the first place.

Yes, this is absolutely true and it’s a very good question. How to prioritize?

Common Vulnerability Scoring System

A natural way. If we look at vulnerabilities with a CVE identifier, for them in the US National Vulnerability Database we can find CVSS Base Score. It is an assessment of vulnerability criticality level.

How is it calculated?

Some person fills the questionnaire: can it be remotely exploited – no, is there public exploit – no, etc.

CVSS framework

The result is a CVSS vector – this is a line in which you can see the main characteristics of this vulnerability and CVSS Base score is the score from 0 to 10 depending on criticality.

This is a natural way of prioritization. But sometimes this method does not give very good results.

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Great OpenVAS news: delay in plugin feed will be dropped, new GVM-Tools for remote management released

Jan Oliver Wagner, CEO of Greenbone and OpenVAS Community leader sent recently several messages to community email list with the great news.

First of all, Greenbone decided to drop two weeks delay in a free plugin feed, that was implemented in June 2017 and made some OpenVAS users pretty nervous.

I wrote about it in “GSM Community Edition and lagging OpenVAS Plugin Feed“. The good thing is that, it has increased interest in NASL scripting among OpenVAS users. I also made some steps in this way in “Adding third party nasl plugins to OpenVAS“. I don’t now why Greenbone finally decided to drop this delay, but I am very glad for this decision. Wise move!

The feed will stay delayed until September 4th, 2017. To demonstrate the current state I used some data from Vulners.com collections. Let’s see the nasl vulnerability detection plugins for CentOS in Nessus and OpenVAS. I know that Windows would be much more clear, but Microsoft released latest MS17-023 bulletin in March, so now there is no much difference there.

CentOS Nessus Openvas 2 week delay

As you can see, no OpenVAS plugins since 2017-08-16, literally two weeks. And I hope this will change very soon.

Don’t forget that NVT will be called now GCF (Greenbone Community Feed) and some advanced enterprise-level checks will be now released only in paid feed.

Another good news is the recent release of open source GVM-Tools for controlling OpenVAS remotelly. It will replace old console client openvas-cli (omp). Let’s try to download and install it on Debian host with installed OpenVAS (see “Installing OpenVAS 9 from the sources“).

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What’s inside Vulners.com database and when were security objects updated last time

As I already wrote earlier, the main advantage of Vulners.com, in my opinion, is openness. An open system allows you to look under the hood, make sure that everything works fine and ask developers uncomfortable questions why there were no updates for a long time for some types of security objects.

You can do this by using the https://vulners.com/api/v3/search/stats/ request, that I already mentioned in “Downloading entire Vulners.com database in 5 minutes

First of all, let’s look at the security objects. This will give us an understanding of Vulners.com basis.

Vulners objects

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Qualys new look and new products

As you all know, it’s Black Hat 2017 time. This year Qualys seems to be the main newsmaker among Vulnerability Management vendors. Qualys Team renewed logo and website, updated marketing strategy, presented two new products: CloudView and CertView. I decided to take a look.

New Qualys Logo

Talking about design, I liked the old logo more. I don’t see “Q” here. Mirrored “9” maybe. 🙂 However, I did not like the blue nut of Tenable before and now it looks right and familiar.

Site design was also changed and simplified. I really liked well-structured qualys.com, where and every scan mode (“Cloud Apps”) had it’s own color and icon.

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