Category Archives: Projects

Barapass console Password Manager

I decided to publish my simple console Password Manager. I called it barapass (github). I’ve been using It for quite some time in Linux and in Windows (in WSL). Probably it will also work natively in Windows and MacOS with minimal fixes, but I haven’t tried it yet.

Barapass logo

Why do people use password managers?

Well, with password manager it’s possible to avoid remembering passwords and make them arbitrarily complex and long. And no one will be able to brute force them. Of course, you can simply store passwords in text files, but password managers are better than this because:

  • no one will see your password over your shoulder;
  • if an attacker gains access to the files on your host, it won’t possible to read your passwords from the encrypted file or storage (well, ideally);
  • it’s easier to search for objects in the password manager and copy values from it.

I wanted something as simple as editing a text file with the key-value content. And I wanted it to be stored in a secure manner, and security could be easily checked, “simple and stupid”.

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Open Positioner: my new project for tracking IT and security jobs

The idea of my new project is to retrieve the data from job-searching websites and provide better filtering, searching and visualization.

I think for the most people who read this, searching for a job in Internet is a pretty common activity. Even if you are not going to change job right now, it might be quite interesting to know what skills are currently the most valuable for your specialization and what is going on on the Global labor market.

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Packabit project: building Nmap deb packages for Ubuntu

During the long New Year holidays (30 dec – 8 jan) I started a new project: Vagrant-based Linux package builder called Packabit. I thought it might be nice to have scripts that will automatically build a Linux packages from sources and will NOT litter main system with unnecessary packages. Something like a very simplified build server.

Packabit - Vagrant-based Linux package builder

Why might someone want to build Linux packages on their own?

Official repositories of Linux distros usually contain pretty old versions of packages. Let’s take, for example, Nmap. The only version of Nmap available in the repository for Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS is 7.60 , and the latest stable version of Nmap available on official website is 7.70.

Release dates according Nmap changelog:

  • Nmap 7.70 [2018-03-20]
  • Nmap 7.60 [2017-07-31]

The latency is more than a year.

Is it really necessary to use the latest version? Actually, yes. Every new version of Nmap contain more banner detects and service detects and produce more adequate results. Nmap project offers official packages only for RPM-based distributions: CentOS, RHEL, Fedora, etc. And if you need packages for DEB-based distributions, Debian, Ubuntu, Kali, etc. you should build them yourself.

What is the Packabit?

Currently it’s just 2 bash scripts for building stable Nmap package for Ubuntu 18.04: one is for creation and launching Vagrant virtual machine, the other runs on guest virtual machine and build Nmap package from the sources.

How to try it

I want this project to be as opensource as possible. If anyone wants to give it a try, get it from Github. For the end-user it looks like this: run the script build_nmap.sh, wait for 10 minutes and get new package from the packages directory. There won’t be any litter in a process. Each time a new virtual machine for building will be automatically created and then destroyed.

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Vulchain scan workflow and search queries

This post will be about my Vulnerability Scanner project – Vulchain. Recently I’ve spent couple of my weekends almost exclusively on coding: refactoring the scan engine, creating API and GUI.

Vulchain scan workflow and search queries

I was doing it because of the conferences, where I will be speaking soon:

Pretty intense schedule for a guy who spends most of his time in PyCharm and Linux console. 😉 Very excited! So, it seemed right to add a couple of slides about my project and show that something is already working.

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Vulchain Scanner: 5 basic principles

New Year holidays in Russia lasts 10 days this year! Isn’t it an excellent opportunity to start a new project? So, I decided to make my own active network vulnerability scanner – Vulchain.

Why? Well, first of all, it’s fun. You can make the architecture from scratch, see the difficulties invisible from the user side and try something new in software development as well.

Vulchain modular scanner

Basic principles of the project. This is not a dogma, but rather a general direction.

  1. Data layers. I would like to have this independent sets of data:
    • Raw data collections
    • Software versions detected from the raw data
    • Vulnerabilities detected from the software versions
    • Exploitability assessment data for the detected vulnerabilities
  2. Modularity. Most of functionality will be performed by the independent modules which read some data from one data level, and create some data on other data level.
  3. Transparency. Data is stored constantly on the all levels. You can easily figure out how the data was  processed, track the errors and modify modules.
  4. Neutrality. All modules are independent and easily replaceable. For example:
  5. Rationality. If it is possible to use some security utility, service or product, we will integrate with them, rather than writing our own analogue. We spend resources only on what will give us the maximum profit at a minimum of costs. 😉

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