Tag Archives: python

Getting Hosts from Microsoft Intune MDM using Python

Today I want to talk about Microsoft Intune. It is a Mobile Device Management platform.

Well, I think that the importance of MDM systems has become much higher than it was before the days of covid-19. Simply because a lot more people now work remotely using corporate laptops. And if these people don’t connect to the corporate network using a VPN, you most likely won’t see any activity from their devices in Active Directory. This means that you will not understand whether the device is active or not. And it will be impossible to get the correct security metrics for these devices.

Mobile device management is a solution to this problem as it maintains a connection between the laptop and the cloud server. MDM can collect various parameters from hosts, but for me the most important parameter is the timestamp. I will not describe all the features of Microsoft Intune here. Simply because at this stage they are not very interesting to me. The task I needed to solve was how to get the timestamp of the last activity for all hosts in Microsoft Intune using the official API. And since this is poorly documented, I want to share it with you.

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Vulners Linux Audit API for Host Vulnerability Detection: Manual Auditing, Python Scripting and Licensing

Hello everyone! This episode will be about Vulners Linux Audit API, which allows you to detect vulnerabilities on a Linux host knowing only the OS version and installed packages. I had a similar post about this 4 years ago, but some details have changed, so I came back to this topic.

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Add new features to Notepad++ using Python scripts: keyboard shortcut to insert current time

I have to say, I spend a lot of time daily in Notepad++ text editor for Windows. I keep my “logbook” there. I record what I am doing now and what needs to be done. This allows me not to keep everything in my head and switch the context more efficiently. I can recommend this to everyone. And it is especially useful to note when you started working on a task and when you finished. This gives an understanding of what actually takes your time. I’m not a fan of very strict and formal techniques such as pomodoro, but using some form of time management is good.

Add new features to Notepad++ using Python scripts: keyboard shortcut to insert current time

Recording timestamps manually is inconvenient. It would be much easier to press a key combination and automatically insert the current timestamp into the document. It turned out that this is possible, and even more – you can get the results of any Python script this way!

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Parsing Nessus v2 XML reports with python

Upd. This is an updated post from 2017. The original script worked pretty well for me until the most recent moment when I needed to get compliance data from Nessus scan reports, and it failed. So I researched how this information is stored in a file, changed my script a bit, and now I want to share it with you.

Previous post about Nessus v2 reports I was writing mainly about the format itself. Now let’s see how you can parse them with Python.

Please don’t work with XML documents the same way you process text files. I adore bash scripting and awk, but that’s an awful idea to use it for XML parsing. In Python you can do it much easier and the script will work much faster. I will use lxml library for this.

So, let’s assume that we have Nessus xml report. We could get it using Nessus API (upd. API is not officially supported in Nessus Professional since version 7) or SecurityCenter API. First of all, we need to read content of the file.

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Detectify Asset Inventory and Monitoring

Continuing the topic about perimeter services. As I mentioned earlier, I don’t think that the external perimeter services should be considered as a fully functional replacement for custom Vulnerability Management processes. I would rather see their results as an additional feed showing the problems your current VM process has. Recently I tested the Detectify’s Asset Inventory (Monitoring) solution, which provides such feed by automatically detecting the issues with your second, third (and more) leveled domains and related web services.

Detectify Asset Inventory screenshot from the official blog

Let say your organization has several second level web domains, over9000 third (and more) level domains, and you even don’t know for what services they are used. This is a normal situation for a large organization. So, you simply add yourorganization.com to Detectify, activate Asset Monitoring, and Detectify automatically discovers third (and more) level domains and related technologies: web services, CMS, JavaScript frameworks and libraries. “It provides thousands of fingerprints and hundreds of tests for stateless vulnerabilities such as code repository exposure for SVN or Git.” This is called fingerprinting.

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Barapass console Password Manager

I decided to publish my simple console Password Manager. I called it barapass (github). I’ve been using It for quite some time in Linux and in Windows (in WSL). Probably it will also work natively in Windows and MacOS with minimal fixes, but I haven’t tried it yet.

Barapass logo

Why do people use password managers?

Well, with password manager it’s possible to avoid remembering passwords and make them arbitrarily complex and long. And no one will be able to brute force them. Of course, you can simply store passwords in text files, but password managers are better than this because:

  • no one will see your password over your shoulder;
  • if an attacker gains access to the files on your host, it won’t possible to read your passwords from the encrypted file or storage (well, ideally);
  • it’s easier to search for objects in the password manager and copy values from it.

I wanted something as simple as editing a text file with the key-value content. And I wanted it to be stored in a secure manner, and security could be easily checked, “simple and stupid”.

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How to get the Organization Units (OU) and Hosts from Microsoft Active Directory using Python ldap3

I recently figured out how to work with Microsoft Active Directory using Python 3. I wanted to get a hierarchy of Organizational Units (OUs) and all the network hosts associated with these OUs to search for possible anomalies. If you are not familiar with AD, here is a good thread about the difference between AD Group and OU.

It seems much easier to solve such tasks using PowerShell. But it will probably require a Windows server. So I leave this for the worst scenario. 🙂 There is also a PowerShell Core, which should support Linux, but I haven’t tried it yet. If you want to use Python, there is a choice from the native python ldap3 module and Python-ldap, which is a wrapper for the OpenLDAP client. I didn’t find any interesting high-level functions in Python-ldap and finally decided to use ldap3.

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