Tag Archives: python

Retrieving IT Asset lists from NetBox via API

A little bit more about IT Asset Inventory of Internal Network, that your IT team can provide. 😉

I have recently worked with NetBox – an open source IP address management (IPAM) and data center infrastructure management (DCIM) solution developed by well-known cloud hosting provider DigitalOcean.

NetBox api

It’s not really about security, not even a CMDB. But, security team still might be interested in NetBox, because it makes possible to track the hosts in some critical subnet without active scanning, providing great visibility of assets. Here I will show a small example of NetBox API usage.

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Asset Inventory for Internal Network: problems with Active Scanning and advantages of Splunk

In the previous post, I was writing about Asset Inventory and Vulnerability Scanning on the Network Perimeter. Now it’s time to write about the Internal Network.

Typical IT-infrastructure of a large organization

I see a typical IT-infrastructure of a large organization as monstrous favela, like Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong. At the beginning it was probably wisely designed, but for years it  was highly effected by spontaneous development processes in various projects as well as multiple acquisitions. And now very few people in the organization really understand how it all works and who owns each peace.

There is a common belief that we can use Active Network Scanning for Asset Inventory in the organization. Currently, I’m not a big fan of this approach, and I will try to explain here the disadvantages of this method and mention some alternatives.

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Asset Inventory for Network Perimeter: from Declarations to Active Scanning

In the previous post, I shared some of my thoughts about the good Asset Inventory system. Of course, for me as a Security Specialist, it would be great if IT will provide such magical system. 🙂 But such an ideal situation is rarely possible. So now let’s see how to build an Asset Inventory system using the resources of Information Security team.

There are no special secrets. It’s necessary to get information about the assets from all available IT systems and then get the rest of the data using our own Assessment tools. I would like to start with hosts on Network Perimeter. The Network Perimeter targets are available at any time for hacker attacks, that’s why this part of the network is the most critical.

Asset Inventory for Network Perimeter

Network Perimeter is like the Wall in the Game of Thrones. The same white walkers are hiding behind the wall and our task is to find the breaches in the wall faster than potential intruders. “Night gathers, and now my watch begins”. (c)

Perimeter is changing constantly. And we should understand at any time what hosts are currently exposed in every office and every external hosting platform.

We can get information about external hosts using some Vulnerability Scanner located on external host in the Internet. I have already wrote about it briefly in  Vulnerability Management for Network Perimeter. Here I would like focus on how we can understand which hosts should be scanned and what useful information we can get from the raw scan results.

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Sending tables from Atlassian Confluence to Splunk

Sometimes when we make automated analysis with Splunk, it might be necessary to use information that was entered or edited manually. For example, the classification of network hosts: do they belong to the PCI-DSS Scope or another group critical hosts or not.

Sending tables from Atlassian Confluence to Splunk

In this case, Confluence can be quite a convenient tool for maintaining such a registry. Page with a table can be created very quickly and multiple employees can immediately start working with it.

Let’s see how to convert such table, export it to Splunk and use it with other data.

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Sending FireEye HX data to Splunk

FireEye HX is an agent-based Endpoint Protection solution. Something like an antivirus, but focused on Advanced Persistent Threats (APT). It has an appliance with GUI where you can manage the agents and see information about detected security incidents.

As with any agent-based solution, it’s necessary to ensure that the agents are installed on every supported host in your network. You may also want to analyze the alerts automatically. And for both purposes you can use Splunk. Let’s see how to do it. 😉

FireEye HX appliance login screen

Note, everything bellow is for FireEye Endpoint Security (HX) 4.0.6 and Splunk 7.0.2. If you use some other version, the things may be quite different.

The main idea is following. We should present FireEye hosts and alerts data in JSON format, add some mandatory fields ans send this packages to Splunk using HTTP Event connector. Then we can process it in Splunk like I’ve shown in “How to correlate different events in Splunk and make dashboards“.

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