Category Archives: Vulnerability

Microsoft Patch Tuesday June 2020: The Bleeding Ghost of SMB

This time, Microsoft addressed 129 vulnerabilities: 11 critical and 118 important. In fact, in the file that I exported from the Microsoft website, I saw 2 more CVEs (CVE-2020-1221, CVE-2020-1328) related to Microsoft Dynamics 365 (on-premises). But there is no information on them on the Microsoft website, in the MITRE CVE database and NVD. Does this mean that these CVE ids were mentioned unintentionally and related to some critical issues? I don’t think so, but this is strange.

This time there were no vulnerabilities with detected exploitation, so let’s start with the group “Exploitation more likely” according to Microsoft.

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How to list, create, update and delete Grafana dashboards via API

I have been a Splunk guy for quite some time, 4 years or so. I have made several blog posts describing how to work with Splunk in automated manner (see in appendix). But after their decision to stop their business in Russia last year, including customer support and selling software and services, it was just a matter of time for me to start working with other dashboarding tools.

How to list, create, update and delete Grafana dashboards via API

For me, Grafana has become such a tool. In this post I want to describe the basic API operations with Grafana dashboards, which are necessary if you need to create and update dozens and hundreds of dashboards. Doing all this in the GUI will be painful. Grafana has a pretty logical and well-documented API. The only tricky moments I had were getting a list of all dashboard and editing an existing dashboard.

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday May 2020: comments from VM vendors, promising stuff for phishing, troubles with SharePoint and lulz with Visual Studio

This will be my third Microsoft Patch Tuesday report in video and audio format. And for the third time in a row, Microsoft has addressed over a hundred vulnerabilities. With my Microsoft Patch Tuesday parser, it was possible to generate a report almost on the same day. But, of course, it takes much more time to describe the vulnerabilities manually.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday May 2020
  • All vulnerabilities: 111
  • Critical: 16
  • Important: 95
  • Moderate: 0
  • Low: 0

Last time I complained that different VM vendors release completely different reports for Microsoft Patch Tuesday. This time I decided that it’s not a bug, but a feature. I upgraded my script to not only show vulnerabilities, but also show how these vulnerabilities were mentioned in the reports of various VM vendors (Tenable, Qualys, Rapid7 and ZDI). In my opinion, it seems pretty useful.

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday April 2020: my classification script, confusing RCE in Adobe Type Manager and updates for older vulnerabilities

Easiest task ever?

Making the reviews of Microsoft Patch Tuesday vulnerabilities should be an easy task. All vulnerability data is publicly available. Even better, dozens of reviews have already been written. Just read them, combine and post. Right?

Microsoft Patch Tuesday April 2020: my classification script, confusing RCE in Adobe Type Manager and updates for older vulnerabilities

Not really. In fact it is quite boring and annoying. It may be fun to write about vulnerabilities that were already used in some real attacks. But this is a very small part of all vulnerabilities. What about more than a hundred others? They are like β€œsome vulnerability in some component may be used in some attack (or may be not)”. If you describe each of them, no one will read or listen this.

You must choose what to highlight. And when I am reading the reports from Tenable, Qualys and ZDI, I see that they choose very different groups of vulnerabilities, pretty much randomly.

My classification script

That’s why I created a script that takes Patch Tuesday CVE data from microsoft.com and visualizes it giving me helicopter view on what can be interesting there. With nice grouping by vulnerability type and product, with custom icons for vulnerability types, coloring based on severity, etc.

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday March 2020: a new record was set, SMBv3 “Wormable” RCE and updates for February goldies

SMBv3 “Wormable” RCE

Without a doubt, the hottest Microsoft vulnerability in March 2020 is the “Wormable” Remote Code Execution in SMB v3 CVE-2020-0796. The most commonly used names for this vulnerability are EternalDarkness, SMBGhost and CoronaBlue.

Microsoft Patch Tuesday for March 2020: a new record was set, SMBv3  "Wormable" RCE and updates for February goldies

There was a strange story of how it was disclosed. It seems like Microsoft accidentally mentioned it in their blog. Than they somehow found out that the patch for this vulnerability will not be released in the March Patch Tuesday. So, they removed the reference to this vulnerability from the blogpost as quickly as they could.

But some security experts have seen it. And, of course, after EternalBlue and massive cryptolocker attacks in 2017, each RCE in SMB means “OMG, this is happening again, we need to do something really fast!” So, Microsoft just had to publish an advisory for this vulnerability with the workaround ADV200005 and to release an urgent patch KB4551762.

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday February 2020

IMHO, these are the two most interesting vulnerabilities in a recent Microsoft Patch Tuesday February 2020:

  • Mysterious Windows RCE CVE-2020-0662. “To exploit the vulnerability, an attacker who has a domain user account could create a specially crafted request, causing Windows to execute arbitrary code with elevated permissions.” Without needing to directly log in to the affected device!
  • Microsoft Exchange server seizure CVE-2020-0688. By sending a malicious email message the attacker can run commands on a vulnerable Exchange server as the system user (and monitor email communications). “the attacker could completely take control of an Exchange server through a single e-mail”.

There were also RCEs in Remote Desktop (Client and Service), a third attempt to fix RCEs in Internet Explorer, Elevation of Privilege, etc. But all this stuff we see in almost every Patch Tuesday and without fully functional exploits it’s not really interesting. πŸ™‚

Read the full reviews in Tenable and Zero Day Initiative blogs.

Big Microsoft day: EOL for Win7, Win2008 and crypt32.dll

Big Microsoft day. End-of-life for Windows 7 desktops and Windows 2008 servers (strictly speaking Windows Server 2008 R2). I think that today many security guys had a fun task to count how many host hosts with win7 and win2008 they still have in the organization. So, Asset Management is a necessity! πŸ™‚

Windows 7 desktop

Now an interesting time should begin, when critical unpatched vulnerabilities may appear for these operation systems. At the same time, the number of hosts with Windows 7 and Windows 2008 will be still big enough for massive attacks. 😈 Although I think that Microsoft will continue to release patches for the most critical vulnerabilities, like they did it for WinXP. Upd. Also note, that for Windows Server 2008/2008r2 it’s also possible to purchase an extended three years  security update subscription.

Windows 2008 server

The second interesting topic is the mysterious vulnerability in crypt32.dll (this dll appeared in Windows more than 20 years ago), which might somehow affect authentication and digital signatures in Windows.

crypt32.dll

Far now it has been only a rumor, but soon it will become clear how dangerous it is and how it can be used.

upd. 15.01. So, what about this vulnerability in crypt32.dll. Now it has the name NSACrypt (because NSA reported it) and the id CVE-2020-0601. It’s not for all versions of Windows, only for Windows 10, Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019.

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