Tag Archives: WordPress

getsploit from Vulners.com

Kirill Isox Ermakov, the founder of Vulners, has recently presented a new open-source tool for searching and downloading exploits – getsploit.

Let’s say we want to pentest some WordPress blog. For example, this website avleonov.com. We can get WordPress version simply using curl:

$ curl -s https://avleonov.com | grep "generator"
<meta name="generator" content="WordPress 4.7.1" />

Ok, let’s get some sploits using this version:

$ sudo apt-get install git
$ git clone https://github.com/vulnersCom/getsploit
Cloning into 'getsploit'...
remote: Counting objects: 32, done.
remote: Compressing objects: 100% (21/21), done.
remote: Total 32 (delta 13), reused 30 (delta 11), pack-reused 0
Unpacking objects: 100% (32/32), done.
Checking connectivity... done.
$ cd getsploit/
$ ./getsploit.py "title:WordPress AND title:4.7.1"

getsploit

As you can see on the screen shot, getsploit makes a search request to vulners.com: bulletinFamily:exploit AND title:WordPress AND title:4.7.1 and matches objects in Immunity Canvas, DSquare Exploit Pack, Exploit-DB, Metasploit, Packet Storm, Malware exploit database, SAINTexploit™, seebug.org, Vulnerability Lab, 0day.today and Zero Science Lab.

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Vulnerability Quadrants

Hi everyone! Today I would like talk about software vulnerabilities. How to find really interesting vulnerabilities in the overall CVE flow. And how to do it automatically.

Vulnerability Quadrant

First of all, let’s talk why we may ever need to analyze software vulnerabilities? How people usually do their Vulnerability Management and Vulnerability Intelligence?

VM strategies

  • Some people have a Vulnerability scanner, scan infrastructure with it, patch founded vulnerabilities and think that this will be enough.
  • Some people pay attention to the vulnerabilities that are widely covered by media.
  • Some people use vulnerability databases and search for the most critical vulnerabilities by some criteria.

Each of these ways have some advantages and some disadvantages.

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Let’s Encrypt for shared hosting

I have recently moved my blog to https using free Let’s Encrypt (Linux Foundation Project) certificate.

Let’s Encrypt service works the best, when you have your own server. You just need to configure some scripts that will regularly request new certificates and everything will work automatically. But, even if your site is on shared hosting, it’s still possible to use Let’s Encrypt. You can make the certificate on your machine, I used Ubuntu Linux, and then add them in the web interface of your hoster, of course if this feature is supported. Certificate will be valid for 4 month, and then you will need make a new one.

To say the truth, I did it because search engines and browser vendors will discriminate http-only sites very soon. And, of course, for fun. Green lock icon in address bar looks cool. ^_^

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Vulners – Google for hacker. How the best vulnerability search engine works and how to use it

Original article was published in Xakep Magazine #06/2016 (in Russian)

vulners.com logo

The common task. Уou need to find all information about some vulnerability: how critical the bug is, whether there is a public exploit, which vendors already released patches, which vulnerability scanner can detect this bug in the system. Previously, you had to search it all manually in dozens of sources (CVEDetails, SecurityFocus, Rapid7 DB, Exploit-DB, CVEs from MITRE / NIST, vendor newsletters, etc.) and analyze the collected data. Today, this routine can be (and should be!) automated with specialized services. One of these services – Vulners.com, the coolest search engine for bugs. And what is the most important – it’s free and has an open API. Let’s see how it can be useful for us.

What is it?

Vulners is a very large constantly updating database of Information Security content. This site lets you search for vulnerabilities, exploits, patches, bug bounty programs the same way a web search engine lets you search for websites. Vulners aggregates and presents in convenient form seven major types of data:

  • Popular vulnerability databases, containing general descriptions of vulnerabilities and links. For example, well-known NVD CVEs of MITRE US agency and NIST Institute. In addition to this, Vulners supports vulnerability descriptions from various research centers and response teams: Vulnerability Lab, XSSed, CERT, ICS, Zero Day Initiative, Positive Technologies, ERPScan.
  • Vendor’s security bulletins. This bug-reports are published by software vendors and contain information about vulnerabilities in their own products. At current moment Vulners supports various Linux distributions (Red Hat, CentOS, Oracle Linux, Arch Linux, Debian, Ubuntu, SUSE), FreeBSD, network devices (F5 Networks, Cisco, Huawei, Palo Alto Networks), popular and critical software (OpenSSL, Samba, nginx, Mozilla, Opera), including CMS (WordPress, Drupal).
  • Exploits from Exploit-DB, Metasploit and 0day.today. Exploits are parsed and stored in full-text form and you can read the sources in a convenient text editor.
  • Nessus plugins for vulnerability detection. It makes easy to find out whether a particular vulnerability can be detected using this popular network scanner. Why is it important? Read in my article “When a free scanning service detects vulnerabilities better“.
  • Bug disclousers for bug bounty programs. At current moment Vulners supports HackerOne and Open Bug Bounty.
  • Potential vulnerabilities of mobile applications and CMS. It is possible in cooperation with the static application security testing (SAST) vendors Hackapp and InfoWatch APPERCUT.
  • Posts from hacking resources. Vulners collects Threatpost and rdot.org publications, which often cover vulnerability related topics.

All this information is handled, cataloged, structured and is always available for the search.

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