Tag Archives: malware

Exploitability attributes of Nessus plugins: good, bad and Vulners

Exploitability is one of the most important criteria for prioritizing vulnerabilities. Let’s see how good is the exploit-related data of Tenable Nessus NASL plugins and whether we can do it better.

Nessus exploitability

What are the attributes related to exploits? To understand this, I parsed all nasl plugins and got the following results.

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Dealing with cybersquatting, typosquatting and phishing

It won’t be a secret to say that phishing remains one of the most effective attack vectors.

For example, your colleague receives by email a malicious web link that looks like a link to your corporate portal and opens it. If your Vulnerability and Patch Management programs are not good enough (see “WannaCry about Vulnerability Management“) and the software on his desktop has some critical and exploitable vulnerabilities in web browser, PDF reader, Microsoft Office, etc., you will probably get compromised host in your network.

This is also a pain for your customers. If someone will be sending messages on behalf of your organization, this can easily lead to fraud and costs in public image. And it will be even harder to detect. You will know about it only if they tell you. And if the attack was not massive, the probability of this is not very high.

High-Tech Bridge Trademark Abuse Radar summary

What can we do about this?

  • We should definitely raise the awareness among co-workers and clients. They should know that such attacks may occur and carefully check the domain before any click. Especially if the letter seems suspicious.
  • On the other hand, we can also act proactively. Find which domains are similar enough to company brand and can be potentially used for phishing or other types of fraud. Then work with owners or registrars of such domains directly.

However, tracking down potentially malicious domains is not an easy task. Where should we take the lists of  all registered domains? What does “similar enough” really mean? Fortunately, there are services that greatly facilitate this task.

And today I would like to write you about a new free service by High-Tech Bridge – Trademark Abuse Radar. BTW, I already wrote earlier about their cool free service and API for SSL/TLS server testing, you can also check this out 😉

Everything is simple. Just enter the domain name you are interested in and in a few minutes you will receive a full report. No authorization for analysis is required, because the report is built on external and open data.

High-Tech Bridge Trademark Abuse Radar input

I chose the Citibank (citibank.com) as one of the most famous banking brand in the world. Let’s see what Trademark Abuse Radar will find.

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Vulnerability Quadrants

Hi everyone! Today I would like talk about software vulnerabilities. How to find really interesting vulnerabilities in the overall CVE flow. And how to do it automatically.

Vulnerability Quadrant

First of all, let’s talk why we may ever need to analyze software vulnerabilities? How people usually do their Vulnerability Management and Vulnerability Intelligence?

VM strategies

  • Some people have a Vulnerability scanner, scan infrastructure with it, patch founded vulnerabilities and think that this will be enough.
  • Some people pay attention to the vulnerabilities that are widely covered by media.
  • Some people use vulnerability databases and search for the most critical vulnerabilities by some criteria.

Each of these ways have some advantages and some disadvantages.

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Rapid7 Nexpose in 2017

Last year I tested Rapid7 Nexpose and wrote two posts about installation and use of Nexpose Community Edition and Nexpose API. I didn’t follow news of this vendor for a about year. Today I watched live demo of Nexpose latest version. It has some new interesting features, improvements and ideas, that I would like to mention.

Rapid7 Nexpose in 2017

And of course, things that sales people say to you should be always taken with some skepticism. Only concrete implementation tested in your environment matters. But they usually mention some useful ideas that can be perceived independently from the products they promote.
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Somebody is watching you: IP camera, TV and Emma Watson’s smartphone

Today I want to talk today about privacy in a most natural sense. You probably have an internet-connected device with camera an microphone: smartphone, tablet, smart TV, ip camera, baby monitor, etc.

– Can it be used to record video/audio and spy on you?
– Of course, yes!
– Only government and device vendor has resources to do it?
– Not really

Somebody is watching you

The sad truth is: most of internet-connected devices have security problems, and, unlike traditional desktops and servers, it’s much harder to patch them. Even if the vendor fixed the issue. The customers, average people, just don’t bother themselves to do it. Each week it’s become easier to access user data and even get full control over device. Hackers and pranksters may do it just for lulz, because they can.

Let’s see it on concrete examples.

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