Category Archives: Video

Microsoft Patch Tuesday November 2022: Exchange ProxyNotShell RCE, JScript9, MoTW, OpenSSL, Edge, CNG, Print Spooler

Hello everyone! This episode will be about Microsoft Patch Tuesday for November 2022, including vulnerabilities that were added between October and November Patch Tuesdays. As usual, I use my open source Vulristics project to create the report.

Alternative video link (for Russia): https://vk.com/video-149273431_456239107

The most important news of this Patch Tuesday was a release of patches for ProxyNotShell Remote Code Execution – Microsoft Exchange (CVE-2022-41040, CVE-2022-41082) mentioned in the previous episode. These vulnerabilities became public on September 28, and updates for this vulnerability did not appear until November 8. Microsoft could have acted more quickly. But it’s good that the problem with these actively exploited vulnerabilities is finally solved.

But besides ProxyNotShell, this November Patch Tuesday had a lot of interesting vulnerabilities. Let’s take a look.

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday October 2022: Exchange ProxyNotShell RCE, Windows COM+ EoP, AD EoP, Azure Arc Kubernetes EoP

Hello everyone! This episode will be about Microsoft Patch Tuesday for October 2022, including vulnerabilities that were added between September and October Patch Tuesdays. As usual, I use my open source Vulristics project to create the report.

Alternative video link (for Russia): https://vk.com/video-149273431_456239106

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Joint Advisory AA22-279A and Vulristics

Hello everyone! This episode will be about the new hot twenty vulnerabilities from CISA, NSA and FBI, Joint cybersecurity advisory (CSA) AA22-279A, and how I analyzed these vulnerabilities using my open source project Vulristics.

Alternative video link (for Russia): https://vk.com/video-149273431_456239105

Americans can’t just release a list of “20 vulnerabilities most commonly exploited in attacks on American organizations.” They like to add geopolitics and point the finger at some country. Therefore, I leave the attack attribution mentioned in the advisory title without comment.

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How to Perform a Free Ubuntu Vulnerability Scan with OpenSCAP and Canonical’s Official OVAL Content

Hello everyone! Five years ago I wrote a blogpost about OpenSCAP. But it was only about the SCAP Workbench GUI application and how to use it to detect security misconfigurations.

Alternative video link (for Russia): https://vk.com/video-149273431_456239104

This time, I will install the OpenSCAP command line tool on Ubuntu and use it to check for vulnerabilities on my local host.

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday September 2022: CLFS Driver EoP, IP packet causes RCE, Windows DNS Server DoS, Spectre-BHB

Hello everyone! Let’s take a look at Microsoft’s September Patch Tuesday. This time it is quite compact. There were 63 CVEs released on Patch Tuesday day. If we add the vulnerabilities released between August and September Patch Tuesdays (as usual, they were in Microsoft Edge), the final number is 90. Much less than usual.

Alternative video link (for Russia): https://vk.com/video-149273431_456239101

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Scanvus – my open source Vulnerability Scanner for Linux hosts and Docker images

Hello everyone! This video was recorded for the VMconf 22 Vulnerability Management conference, vmconf.pw. I will be talking about my open source project Scanvus. This project is already a year old and I use it almost every day.

Alternative video link (for Russia): https://vk.com/video-149273431_456239100

Scanvus (Simple Credentialed Authenticated Network VUlnerability Scanner) is a vulnerability scanner for Linux. Currently for Ubuntu, Debian, CentOS, RedHat, Oracle Linux and Alpine distributions. But in general for any Linux distribution supported by the Vulners Linux API. The purpose of this utility is to get a list of packages and Linux distribution version from some source, make a request to an external vulnerabililty detection API (only Vulners Linux API is currently supported), and show the vulnerability report.

Scanvus can show vulnerabilities for

  • localhost
  • remote host via SSH
  • docker image
  • inventory file of a certain format

This utility greatly simplifies Linux infrastructure auditing. And besides, this is a project in which I can try to implement my ideas on vulnerability detection.

Example of output

For all targets the output is the same. It contains information about the target and the type of check. Then information about the OS version and the number of Linux packages. And finally, the actual information about vulnerabilities: how many vulnerabilities were found and the criticality levels of these vulnerabilities. The table shows the criticality level, bulletin ID, CVE list for the bulletin, and a comparison of the invulnerable fixed package version with the actual installed version.

This report is not the only way to present results. You can optionally export the results to JSON (OS inventory data, raw vulnerability data from Vulners Linux API or processed vulnerability data).

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Microsoft Patch Tuesday August 2022: DogWalk, Exchange EOPs, 13 potentially dangerous, 2 funny, 3 mysterious vulnerabilities

Hello everyone! In this episode, let’s take a look at the Microsoft Patch Tuesday August 2022 vulnerabilities. I use my Vulristics vulnerability prioritization tool as usual. I take comments for vulnerabilities from Tenable, Qualys, Rapid7, ZDI and Kaspersky blog posts. Also, as usual, I take into account the vulnerabilities added between the July and August Patch Tuesdays.

Alternative video link (for Russia): https://vk.com/video-149273431_456239098

There were 147 vulnerabilities. Urgent: 1, Critical: 0, High: 36, Medium: 108, Low: 2.

There was a lot of great stuff this Patch Tuesday. There was a critical exploited in the wild MSDT DogWalk vulnerability, 3 critical Exchange vulnerabilities that could be easily missed in prioritization, 13 potentially dangerous vulnerabilities, 2 funny vulnerabilities and 3 mysterious ones. Let’s take a closer look.

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