Category Archives: API

Kenna Security: Analyzing Vulnerability Scan data

I’ve been following Kenna Security (before 2015 Risk I/O) for a pretty long time. Mainly, because they do the things I do on a daily basis: analyse various vulnerability scan results and feeds, and prioritize detected vulnerabilities for further mitigation. The only difference is that my scripts and reports are highly specific for my employer’s infrastructure and needs. And guys from Kenna team make a standardized scalable cloud solution that should be suitable for everyone.

I think their niche is really great. They do not compete directly with Vulnerability Management vendors. They can be partners with any of them, bringing additional features to the customers. Perfect win-win combination. That’s why Kenna speakers regularly participate in joint webinars with VM vendors.

I couldn’t lose a great opportunity to see Kenna Security service in action. 😉

In this post I will try to make a very brief review of Kenna functionality and formulate pros and cons of the solution.

When you submit trial request at https://www.eu.kennasecurity.com/signup (or https://app.kennasecurity.com/signup if you are not in Europe) you will get a link to your company account:

https://corporation.eu.kennasecurity.com/

The login screen will look like this:

Kenna login

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Confluence REST API for reading and updating wiki pages

In previous posts I wrote how to automate the work with Atlassian Jira, including automated ticket labeling. Now let’s try to use REST API of another popular Atlassian product – Confluence wiki engine.

Confluence REST API

What you may want to automate in Confluence? Obviously, it may be useful to read the pages that your colleagues regularly update and then use this data in some scripts as an input. You may also want to update your own Confluence pages, for example to post Vulnerability Scanning results. 😉

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New Nessus 7 Professional and the end of cost-effective Vulnerability Management (as we knew it)

It’s an epic and really sad news. 🙁

Nessus 7 release

When people asked me about the cost-effective solution for Vulnerability Management I usually answered: “Nessus Professional with some additional automation through Nessus API”.

With just a couple of Nessus Professional scanning nodes it was possible to scan all the infrastructure and network perimeter (see “Vulnerability Management for Network Perimeter“). Price for each node was fixed and reasonable. And you could make your any reports from the raw scan data, as you like it.

Nessus Pro was still were best choice even when Tenable:

  • Cut off master/slave functionality in Nessus and created “Nessus Manager”.
  • Changed API completely during the update from 5 to 6 version.
  • Gradually increased the price from $1,5k to $2,7k per scanning node per year.

But unfortunately it’s not anymore. End of an era.

And what is even more sad is that Tenable does not mention disabling the API and multi-user function in the main Nessus 7 marketing, as it never was, as if it’s not very important. Just look at “Announcing Nessus Professional v7” – not a word  about “API” or users. Only in additional link:

get more information Nessus7

Only there, in the text (not a video) there is an information about removed features.

The nice little things like “Easily transferable license” and “Emailed scan reports and custom report name / logo” do not make it any better.

So, what next?

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Vulners.com vulnerability detection plugins for Burp Suite and Google Chrome

What is the main idea of version-based vulnerability detection, especially for Web Applications? With an access to the HTTP response (html, headers, scripts, etc.), you can get the name and version of some standards web application (e.g. CMS, CRM, wiki, task tracker) or names and versions of software components that this web application uses: web server, libraries, frameworks, and so on.

Vulners plugins for Burp Suite Professional and Google Chrome

Next step is to get all known vulnerabilities and exploits  for this software. This is the typical task for Vulners.com – largest database and security content searching system (see “Vulners – Google for hacker“).

So, guys from Vulners Team made a set of useful regular expressions for detecting software names and versions – https://vulners.com/api/v3/burp/rules.  You can use this rules in your own scripts and if you want something that will work out of the box, you can try existing plugins for Burp Suite and Google Chrome.

In this post I would like to show how the detection rules work, present new Vulners Burp API and vulnerability detection plugins for Burp Suite and Google Chrome.

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Processing .docx and .xlsx files with Python

MS Office documents are probably one of the most inconvenient and poorly formalized data sources. It’s much better to keep all the data in specialized databases or at least in wiki. But in real life, MS Office documents, especially Excel and Word, are in active use in nearly every organization. Simply because it is a flexible and easy tool that anyone can use. That’s why it’s important to know an automated ways for processing such files.

Processing MS office files with python

You can easily edit .docx files without any libraries. Technically it’s just a zip archive. So, you can unzip it, make a replacement in the document.xml file and make a zip it again. It’s much better than dealing with old binary .doc files. But there are even more elegant ways.

Let’s says, we need to read data from .xlsx document and generate .docx files based on some existing template. To work with .xlsx files I will use openpyxl python library.

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Atlassian Jira, Python and automated labeling

I have already wrote about Atlassian Jira automation in “Automated task processing with JIRA API“. But all examples there were with using of curl. So, I decided to make one more post about Jira API. This time with python examples and about labeling issues (nice wordplay, right? 😉 ).

Jira Labels and Python

You can use labeles for organizing issues on Jira Scrum and Kanban Boards, Jira Dashboards or just for advanced searching (e.g. labels = "LabelName")

Let’s start from the basics.

How to search Jira issues from your own python scripts?

It’s easy. Send a post request to /rest/api/2/search/ with some JQL expression. Jira server will return first 50 matching issues. If you need more, set a startAt parameter and repeat post requests while the number of issues you requested is less than total number of founded issues (parameter in response).

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Automating Opera browser with Selenium WebDriver and Python

The right way to automate a web application is, certainly, to understand how this application works, by using burp (see “Burp Suite Free Edition and NTLM authentication in ASP.net applications“) for example, retrieve all necessary requests and learn how to use them.

However, this is sometimes so difficult and confusing, especially when the site owners are actively fighting with automation attempts. In this case, you may want to automate somehow the work on the highest level, with the graphical elements of the site. You can view them as some pictures, as SikuliX does (“SikuliX: the last chance for automation“, or as some elements of code, as Selenium IDE does (“Selenium, SikuliX and Facebook posting“).

But it would much better to control the browser itself from the Python scripts. And this can be done with Selenium WebDriver.

Selenium WebDriver, Python and Opera browser

Guys from Guru99 have wrote me a letter about their free course about Selenium.

This course looks pretty good. In the first part you can find a detailed description of Selenium components and the project history. After reading this, I finally decided that the Selenium WebDriver suited me best. Examples of WebDriver usage are written in Java, and I wanted to use Python. But since the calls are the same, lessons of this course are still more than useful.

And despite the fact that Selenium is usually used with Firefox, I tried to use it with Chromium-based Opera. This browser is very popular in Russia because of some unique features. 😉

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